Edwin Beunk Collection


 
What did composers have to deal with; how did it sound; how did it feel? This we learned: the pianoforte is not a deficient version or a simple step in a development that finally gave us the modern piano.
In Mozart’s time builders like Walter and Schanz knew exactly what they were doing and their instruments were precisely what Mozart and Haydn wished for. Developments in the piano were parallel to what happened in society, where another type of audience started attending concerts. Concert halls and orchestras got bigger and romanticism required the piano to sing and replace the speaking quality of the instrument of Mozart’s days. Competition between builders was not only about quality of sound but very much about loudness and tuning-stability. A rapid development of the piano took place between 1770 and 1870.
With 20 examples the Edwin Beunk Collection covers all the important stages of piano history up to 1870. Pianos by great builders like Rosenberger, Graf, Streicher, Broadwood, Erard, Pleyel and Blüthner give a perfect impression of the sounding history of the fortepiano.


 














 

 




 


                                              

Anonymous, ca. 1785 

The case in solid oak, the keyboard compass 5 octaves, FF-f3
one knee lever for forte and a hand stop for the moderator 

     

 
 
 
 
 

 

Michael Rosenberger, Vienna ca. 1800 

The case in walnut, the keyboard compass 5½ octaves, FF-c4.
Two knee levers: moderator and forte. 
 

                                                                                                                              

 


 

 
 
 
 

Mathias Müller, Vienna ca. 1810 
The case in mahogany, the keyboard compass 6 octaves: FF-f4
four pedals: una-corda, bassoon, moderator, forte 
 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Joachim Ehlers, Vienna 1815.
 
The case in mahogany with bronze decorations and a painting of an
Italian fantasy land/sea scape on the pinblock. The keyboard compass 6 octaves FF-f4.
Five pedals: una-corda,bassoon, moderator, forte and drum/bells.
(In the background an Erard square of 1844)
                                              
 
 
 
 
 

 


 


 
 

Johann Schanz, Vienna ca. 1823 
The case in walnut, the keyboard compass
6½ octaves, CC-f4.
five pedals: una-corda,bassoon, forte, moderator, drum/bells
 







 

 



 

 


 
 
 
 

 
Conrad Graf, Vienna, ca. 1830 
The case in walnut, the keyboard compass 6½
octaves, CC-g4.
Four pedals: una-corda, moderator, double moderator, forte. 
 
 

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Conrad Graf, Vienna ca. 1835 
The case in cherry, the keyboard compass 6½ octaves, CC-g4.
Four pedals: una-corda, moderator, double moderator, forte. 
 


 


 
 
 
 
 
 

 
J.B. Streicher, Vienna 1847 
The case in mahagony, the keyboard compass 7 octaves AAA-a4.
Two pedals: una-corda, forte. 




 
 


Carl Stein, Vienna ca. 1855

the case in walnut, the keyboard compass 7 1/4 (!) octaves, AAA-c5. The instrument is not restored yet.





 









Ignace Pleyel, Paris 1829
The case in mahogany, the keyboard compass 6½ octaves, CC-f4.
Two pedals: una-corda, forte 
 

 


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Erard Paris 1837 

The case in rosewood, the keyboard compass 6¾ octaves. CC-a4
(originally CC-f4)
2 pedals

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 



                           


 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

















Ignace Pleyel, 
Paris 1842
 
The keyboard compass 
6½ octaves, the case
in mahogany.
 
 
 


 
 















Blüthner, Leipzig ca. 1867

                               



                                                                                             
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Broadwood & Son, London 1807
 
The case in mahogany, the keyboard compass 5½ octaves.
Three pedals: una-corda, forte, forte for only the right side of the keyboard.


                          


 





John Broadwood & Sons, London 1822